Vote 2020!

(Image by Venita Oberholster from Pixabay)

There is still time to register to vote!  Do not miss your opportunity to have your voice heard in the local, state, and national election process.

Registration deadline is October 5, 2020!

Thank you!

Have you registered to vote yet? 

https://registertovoteflorida.gov/eligibilityreactive

https://www.usa.gov/register-to-vote

Poetic Fridays

(Image by Peggy und Marco Lachmann-Anke from Pixabay)

 

The Revolution is being televised

The Revolution is being televised

America can no longer hide behind the lies

We see the injustices daily

The same ones that leave us flailing

Just like we had when we sang ‘We shall overcome’

How long does the revolution need to go on?

Before the injustices of this land come to an end

Lucky for us the cameras have begun to roll

Because without the footage nobody would believe the carnage

That occurs daily and causes fear

That continues to show on the nightly news

Even though the perpetrators know they are recorded

The Revolution is being televised

But, does it matter?

Black Wall Street

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Hostility Sculpture in Tulsa, Oklahoma

(Image by Mike Goad from Pixabay)

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”.

(Dr. Martin Luther King)

My first introduction to Black Wall Street came when I served as a panelist for a Florida State University (FSU) Black Student Union (BSU) program.  The students invited me to enhance their professional development program, but I got a history lesson I did not expect or know I needed.

I love working with college students because they bring a passion for subjects they are interested in and that passion keeps them curious and intent on growing daily. My role on the panel was to help BSU students understand how to present themselves when networking for future career opportunities.  We got that process going and had a good question and answer session with lots of input from the students in attendance.

One of the students present asked the moderator why the activities for the week was labeled Black Wall Street?  The response is where my education on the subject began.

The BSU leaders saw Black History Month as the perfect time to educate its members and guests on important periods, i.e., The Harlem Renaissance, Black Wall Street, Black Excellence and Black Power.  I was familiar with each of the periods identified for the month except Black Wall Street.  I assumed this was BSU’s way to show members how to build financial freedom and eventually make their way to Wall Street (NYC).  I was wrong and totally missed the boat on the meaning of Black Wall Street.

The BSU leadership wanted to show members how financial freedom could be gained by following the blueprint laid out by the founders of the true Black Wall Street in Greenwood, Oklahoma (Tulsa).  I had never heard of Black Wall Street, Greenwood, Oklahoma or the massacre that happened there in the early 1920’s.  My students were more than happy to fill me in on another history lesson I never received during my formal education programs—this seems to be a common theme with American history.

The concept a black town in Oklahoma was self-sufficient in the 1920’s seemed unreal at first but decided to learn more after talking with students.  I consider myself a lifelong learner and this was another educational journey I needed to fully see the great things that happened on Black Wall Street prior to the massacre.

O.W. Gurley was a prominent figure who relocated to the Greenwood district and purchased land which then could only be sold to people of color.  This was Gurley’s vision to establish a place for the black population.  Most of his businesses were frequented by black migrants fleeing the oppression of the Mississippi delta.  Gurley worked with others to pool their financial resources and support the thriving businesses being developed in Greenwood.  The residents of Black Wall Street were doctors, lawyers, and entrepreneurs. The success of the black residents of Greenwood played a role in the 1921 massacre because of the jealousy of their white neighbors in nearby Tulsa.

My Black Wall Street education increased my knowledge of this important period of Black History and led me to dig deeper on the actual massacre.  The news program, 60 Minutes did a report on Black Wall Street and the massacre a few years ago.  This led to additional investigations and a team has been formed to find and excavate hidden graves to bring closure for descendants of the massacre victims.  This painful piece of American history continues to garner interest and my hope is we never experience something like this again.

Learn more about what happened in Greenwood here:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/antoinegara/2020/06/18/the-bezos-of-black-wall-street-tulsa-race-riots-1921/#65183f08f321

60 Minutes program on Greenwood, Oklahoma:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yA8t8PW-OkA

“History has shown us that courage can be contagious, and hope can take on a life of its own”.

(Michelle Obama)

 

Black Lives Matter Role Call

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(Image by CQF-avocat from Pixabay)

Usually when people are sad, they don’t do anything.   They just cry over their condition.  But when they get angry, they bring about a change.”

(Malcolm X.)

Guess it is time to get angry again.  Day after day we read of another black person being killed in America for no reason other than being black.  Terribly sad to keep writing this same line month after month after month.  We cannot go a month without another instance of police killing or shooting someone black simply because they are black.

American politicians condemn OTHER countries for violating the human rights of their citizens but have nothing to say when black people are brutalized in America.  The Supreme Leader of North Korea, Kim Jong-un receives the wrath of the American political system when he imprisons his citizens for no cause but police killing a black person in America gets nothing.  Weird world, huh?

Chinese troops storm Tiananmen Square in 1989 and killed over 300 Chinese citizens and three weeks later the U.S. CONGRESS votes to impose economic sanctions on the Peoples Republic of China.  The Chinese government brutalized Chinese citizens and the U.S. government was so appalled that we imposed sanctions and condemned the Chinese government.  Police killing black people in America gets nothing.

Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi citizen is attacked, beaten, killed, and dismembered by officials of the Saudi Arabian government at the consulate in Turkey.  Multiple senators and congress members swiftly condemned this act and DEMANDED the Saudi government do something.  Black man gets shot in the back SEVEN times in Wisconsin gets nothing.

Citizens of Hong Kong protest for human rights against the Chinese government and the United States government passes the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act on 27 November 2019.  https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/1838/text.  Americans march daily for police reform, human rights, equal treatment and to stop the senseless killing of black people—no Human Rights and Democracy Act for the death of black Americans.  Would say that is a double standard but it is more joke than anything else.

Marching, praying, and voting have not ignited the change needed in America.  Maybe Malcolm X. was right all the time—we need our day in court at the United Nations to put America on trial for neglect of citizens.  The daily videos of black people being beaten, brutalized, and killed would present an open and shut case in a court of law.

My court argument would be:

  • How do you defend a cop’s knee on a black man’s neck (George Floyd) for 8 minutes and 46 seconds?
  • How do you defend Louisville cops with a no knock warrant shooting a black women (Breonna Taylor) who was in the BED?
  • How do you defend three Georgia overzealous citizens who run down, trap and then kill a black man (Ahmaud Arbery) out for a jog?
  • How do you defend a Kenosha, Wisconsin police officer who shot a black man (Jacob Blake) 7 times in the BACK in front of his kids?
  • How do you plead America?

Verdict:  guilty, guilty, guilty, guilty. 

The defense rests, being black in America is an exhausting experience.

Please vote—thank you!

 “We declare our right on this earth to be a man, to be a human being, to be respected as a human being, to be given the rights of a human being in this society, on this earth, in this day, which we intend to bring into existence by any means necessary”.

(Malcolm X.)